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Welcome to the Cathedral Parish e-News for this weekend. If you experience difficulty accessing any content, please visit stpatscathedral.weebly.com
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St Patrick's Cathedral, Ballarat


Communities of Alfredton, Ballarat, Cardigan
Lake Gardens, Lake Wendouree, Lucas, Newington

 


St Patrick's Cathedral Parish acknowledges that the Aboriginal people of Australia are our first nation peoples and the traditional owners and custodians of this land.

We are a child safe Parish following the Child Safe Standards outlined by the Victorian Government, implementing procedures and standards as directed by the Professional Standards Office of the Catholic Diocese of Ballarat.

 

PALM SUNDAY

28th March 2021

 
3 Lyons St Sth Ballarat


Parish Office hours:
Tuesday - Friday
10.00am - 5.00pm

On Mondays the Parish Office is closed.

Please note the Parish Office will be closed on
Good Friday and Easter Monday.



On weekends and after regular office hours,
the phone will be transferred to the on call priest
so that the Hospitals, Aged Care facilities, Funeral Directors
or others seeking the services of a priest may be responded to.

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Prayer and Worship in the Cathedral this week

Monday 29th March
8.00am Morning Prayer
11.00 Funeral Marie Fitzpatrick
6.30pm Mass of Oils

Tuesday 30th March
8.00am Morning Prayer
10.00am Mass
5.30pm Evening Prayer  

Wednesday 31st March   
8.00am Morning Prayer
10.00am Mass   
5.30pm Evening Prayer


 
 
 

Readings for this week: Palm Sunday

First:  Isaiah 31:31-34       Second:   Philippians 2:6-11

Gospel:     Mark 14:1-15:47


Readings for next week:


First:  Acts of the Apostles 10:34. 37-43    Second: Colossians 3:1-4

Gospel:  John 20:1-9

Holy Week in the Cathedral Parish

Registrations are open for the Holy Week Liturgies in the Cathedral Parish.
Up to 300 can be registered in the Cathedral and up to 120 can be registered in the Chapel at St Pat’s College.

We are grateful to all at St Pat’s College for their cooperation and generosity by making their Chapel available to us.

Registrations may be made after Masses at the Cathedral this weekend or by email or telephone to the Cathedral Parish Office
(10am-5pm, Tuesday – Friday).


Holy Thursday, Evening Mass of the Lord’s Supper

7.00pm Mass  -  St Patrick’s Cathedral (9.30pm Night Prayer)

7.00pm Mass  -  St Patrick’s College Chapel


Good Friday, Celebration of the Lord’s Passion

3.00pm Liturgy  -  St Patrick’s Cathedral

3.00pm Liturgy  -  St Patrick’s College Chapel


Holy Saturday, Easter Vigil

8.00pm Mass  -  St Patrick’s Cathedral


Easter Sunday Masses

8.00am  -  St Patrick’s Cathedral

10.00am  -  St Patrick’s College Chapel

10.30am  -  St Patrick’s Cathedral

5.00pm  -  St Patrick’s Cathedral


RECENT DEATHS:
Marie Fitzpatrick

ANNIVERSARIES:
Patricia Aitkin
Nikoluois Bauer

Michael Kevin Caulfield
Kathleen Collier
Joyce Daly
Fr Meredith Delahenty
Fr Luke Fay
Duncan Hartwig
Sr Una Hulme
John Lynch
Br Raymond Miller

Mary Ralston
Doreen Rogers
Mark Taylor
Luciana Turicchi
John Woof

We welcome to our Parish this weekend through the Sacrament of Baptism:

Harper Maree Lawrey, daugther of
Christopher and Jayde
Giulietta Maree Pratt, daughter of Steven and Danielle
Tex Bannon Wright, son of Geoffrey and Corinne

“The Church gives the faith to your children through Baptism and you have the task to make it grow…” Pope Francis.

May these children grow in faith with the support of their
families and our Catholic Community.


For over half a century, generations of Australians have participated in Project Compassion, making it one of the nation’s longest running charity campaigns.

Throughout five decades of natural disasters, conflicts and crises, Caritas Australia has worked alongside vulnerable communities with the generous support of Australians. Project Compassion has also helped with access to education, health services, agricultural training and through programs that reduce maternal and infant mortality.

This year, we have presented five stories from people striving to ‘Be More’ – just a few amongst the millions who have been helped through Project Compassion.

As we celebrate this Australian icon, we would like to thank generations of supporters nationwide for their generosity, which allows us to move forward with lifesaving strategies to tackle new challenges.

Please donate to Project Compassion 2021 to help continue empowering vulnerable communities around the world lift themselves and their communities out of poverty.

You can donate through Parish boxes and envelopes, by visiting Caritas here or phoning 1800 024 413.


Way of the Cross by Majellan Media

The 14 Stations of the Cross have been modernised for today’s world by Fr Tony Kelly CSsR, and are powerful mediations about Christ’s Passion on Good Friday.

The reflections are read by Fr John Hill CSsR and the presentation features Aboriginal paintings and images of the Australian outback. You can read the transcript from the Redemptorist’s website here:

https://cssr.org.au/2020/07/03/way-of...

Credit: The Stations of the Cross used in the were painted by John Dunn
https://www.facebook.com/Johndunnabor... via the Aboriginal Catholic Ministry https://www.cam1.org.au/acmv

The Amnesty Group of Ballarat invites you to join them on a Palm Sunday Justice Walk in support of refugees:

Sunday 28th March

Meet at 2.00pm at View Point, Lake Wendouree and walking to the
Olympic Rings.
CatholicCare Victoria
‘Today as we celebrate in anticipation, the opportunities of a unified statewide social service agency of the Catholic Church in Victoria, we also take time to reflect on the histories and exceptional achievements contributed by each of the agencies coming together.’

Agnes Sheehan, Chief Executive Officer of CatholicCare Victoria spoke these words at the official Opening and Commissioning Mass of CatholicCare Victoria on Wednesday 24 March.

More than 150 people including CatholicCare Victoria Board members, staff, volunteers, donors, clients and friends gathered at St Anthony of Padua parish in Melton South, to formally celebrate the opening of the new entity.

On 1 January 2021, CatholicCare Melbourne/Gippsland, CatholicCare Sandhurst and Centacare Ballarat merged to become CatholicCare Victoria, which is now the social service agency of the Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne and the Catholic Dioceses of Sale, Sandhurst and Ballarat.

Principal celebrant Archbishop Peter A Comensoli of the Melbourne Archdiocese was joined by Bishop Shane Mackinlay of the Sandhurst Diocese, Bishop Paul Bird of the Ballarat Diocese, Bishop Greg Bennet of the Sale Diocese and a number of local priests in celebrating the Mass.

In her opening remarks, Agnes Sheehan shared that in 1935, two social workers, Norma Parker and Connie Moffitt, undertook an appraisal of Melbourne’s Catholic child welfare institutions for Archbishop Mannix. They recommended an integrated approach to working with families in need and the Catholic Social Services Bureau was established, the first of its kind in Australia.

In 1977, the Ballarat Diocesan Family Service began followed by CatholicCare Sandhurst in 1986 and then CatholicCare Gippsland in 1998.

‘Fast-forward to December 2020, and Norma and Connie’s vision for an integrated and coordinated approach to Church social services moved even closer to reality when our Victorian bishops, Archbishop Peter and Bishop Paul, Bishop Shane and Bishop Greg, signed the Deed of Transition to bring the four social service agencies together,’ said Agnes.

A skeleton for the Plenary Council agenda

Continuing the journey, the working document (or instrumentum laboris), is another stepping stone towards the Plenary Council (PC). How you view this document, provided explicitly both to those few hundred called to be PC participants and to the whole Catholic community, depends very much on your expectations. Few Catholics had any prior idea because the document was mysterious and written behind closed doors. As well as the writing team, presumably the Australian bishops and perhaps the Vatican shaped the final product.
The document describes itself as an initial reference point and as a skeleton for a future PC agenda. The job of putting flesh on the bones will be crucial and must be done as openly as possible. This one was written by a four-person team, including Archbishop Timothy Costelloe, Fr Kevin Lenehan and two other church employees, Daniel Ang and Dr Trudy Dantis, the lone woman. There was no public discussion.

The document is meant to be widely read. It contains a preface and five chapters, of which the agenda will come largely from the third and the fourth, a distillation of ‘what the People of God have expressed, especially — though not exclusively — in the Listening and Dialogue and Listening and Discernment phases of the Plenary Council journey’. In other words, they are a distillation of the six Listening and Discernment papers. The first chapter is an informative historical introduction, ‘the story so far’. The second chapter is a theological reflection, and the fifth chapter proposes St Mary Mackillop as a model of Australian discipleship and issues an invitation to follow in the footsteps of her ‘practical spirituality’.

The whole document is not just about possible agenda items but, perhaps more significantly, about the style, approach and process by which topics will be discussed. Ignatian discernment is at the heart of this approach. It is through such discernment by all participants that the Holy Spirit will be revealed.

The difficult task of producing such a document must be acknowledged. We should appreciate its strengths and recognise its purpose. It discusses most possible agenda items and in doing so offers some bold statements and striking summaries of the situation the church finds itself in.

Read this article by John Warhurst here.

The annual Pontifical Good Friday Collection

The annual Pontifical Good Friday Collection for the Holy Land helps Christians in the Middle East, but also supports maintenance of the Holy Places where Jesus walked.

Faith, Memory and Culture

The Holy Places Holy Land Franciscans staff and maintain the Holy Places and shrines. This enables those who live in the Holy Land and those who visit to deepen their faith and their spiritual and cultural connection to Salvation history. Due to the Covid-19 Pandemic, there has been a dramatic loss of income due to the closure of the shrines and the lack of pilgrims. However, the maintenance and care of the shrines has had to continue as well as supporting the local people whom they employ.

Social and Charitable Activities

In order to assist Christians to remain in the Holy Land, including the poor and young couples, the Custody builds hundreds of residential units. Additionally, they build senior care facilities. Medical assistance is provided for the needy. Due to the Pandemic, there has had a significantly greater demand for assistance while at the same time, a dramatic loss of income.

Educational and Scientific Activities

The Franciscans operate and support schools open to all, regardless of religion or nationality. They provide scholarships for students to prepare them to get jobs and remain in the Holy Land to be part of living Catholic communities. Funds are distributed to young people studying to become priests or religious. Finally, Franciscan archaeologists pursue ongoing research at the Holy Places discovering historical artifacts.

Pastoral Activities

The Franciscans provide pastoral care in 29 parishes in the Holy Land offering Worship, Christian Formation, youth and family programs, as well as guided tours for pilgrims attending the shrines and holy places. With the closure of churches and shrines and the loss of pilgrims due to the Pandemic, pastoral care has needed to continue but with fewer resources.

Liturgical, Ecumenical and Communications Programs

The Franciscan Media Center tells the story of the Holy Land through multimedia distributed throughout the world in more than seven languages. The friars organize Liturgical Celebrations for the local Christians and Pilgrims and share with other Christian communities in the Holy Land in ongoing Ecumenical co-operation.

The Pontifical Good Friday Collection 2021 will continue to support the works of the Holy Land Custody through the generosity of the Australian Church.

Thank you.




Year of the Family




Pope Francis launched the “Amoris Laetitia Family Year” on March 19, the 5th anniversary of the publication of his Apostolic Exhortation Amoris laetitia, a document on the beauty and joy of love in the family.  

The year will conclude on June 26, 2022 on the occasion of the 10th World Meeting of Families in Rome with the Holy Father. 

The launch was a virtual event entitled, “Our Daily Love”, organised by the Vatican Dicastery for the Laity, the Family and Life, the Diocese of Rome and the Pontifical John Paul II Theological Institute, all based in Rome.

The event is available to view online here.

Celebrating 60 years of Catholic Education in Wendouree
-
Save the Date -

Our Lady Help of Christians School, Wendouree will celebrate 60 years of Catholic Education in Wendouree on Friday, October 15, 2021.  

Register for event updates on the OLHC Wendouree school website www.olhcwendouree.catholic.edu.au
or by contacting the school office, ph. 5339 4726.


PLANNED GIVING

Thank you for contributing to the Cathedral collections this week:

Parish $ 1,422.00
Presbytery $ 819.00

Any queries or concerns, or to make a contribution, please contact the Parish Office or email Finance Officer Kerrie.


Gospel Reflection
The gospel account of the suffering and death of Jesus opens with the story of an insightful but unnamed woman who pours out healing ointment on the head of Jesus. We might reflect on the Eucharistic character of her actions of breaking and pouring and of Jesus’ assurance that what she has done will be told in memory of her. She did “what she could”. The story of her support for Jesus is sandwiched between two stories of opposition: an assassination plot on the part of the religious authorities, and the foreshadowing of Jesus’ betrayal at the hands of a close follower. Status does not guarantee goodness or insight.

As the story unfolds, we hear that, despite his earlier instruction to “stay awake”, Jesus’ closest followers fall asleep when he most needs them. Worse than that, they betray, deny, and abandon him. Some Galilean women remain faithful. They have followed him and looked after him on the long journey from Galilee to Jerusalem. They become witnesses to his death and burial. These women will also discover the empty tomb and take the message of the resurrection to the male disciples. A foreign passer-by, Simon, whose sons are known to the Markan community, shoulders part of the burden. An ordinary Roman soldier realises and proclaims that Jesus is of God.

The story has come full circle: the first verse of the gospel announced the beginning of the good news of Jesus, the Christ and the Son of God. Now the reader understands what it means to make such a proclamation. The final chapter is to be celebrated next weekend. The mystery is to be lived every day of every week. As we enter into the holiest week of the liturgical year, we might consider our call to bring the power of Christ’s redeeming love to those who suffer crucifixion in our own times: those whose health systems cannot cope in this time of pandemic; the more-than-human Earth community that suffers the effects of climate change; the desperate asylum seekers who await release after years in detention; the war-torn lands of Yemen and Syria.

For stories of hope in the face of despair, you may like to visit the Mercy Works website (mercyworks.org.au). It is all too easy to deny, betray, and abandon the suffering other. Like the woman who poured out the healing ointment on the head of Jesus, we also must do what we can.


Veronica Lawson RSM
Join us in Celebration of St Joseph!

Pope Francis in his Apostolic Letter, Patris Corde, called the Church to set aside 2021 as a year to focus our attention on St Joseph as patron of the Universal Church.

Saint Mary MacKillop and Fr Julian Tenison Woods, the co-founders of the Sisters of Saint Joseph of the Sacred Heart, chose St Joseph to be patron of the Congregation and so we rejoice in this opportunity to pray with and for the people of God with St Joseph.

During this year, the Congregation will mark each of its primary feasts with special prayers and celebrations. The first of these will be a week of prayer in preparation for the feast of St Joseph followed by other events:
  • 19 March the feast of St Joseph
  • 1 May the feast of St Joseph the Worker;
  • 8 August the feast of St Mary MacKillop and;
  • 7 October the anniversary of the death of Fr Julian Tenison Woods.

Seven Days of Prayer with St Joseph

Leading up to the Feast of St Joseph on 19 March (starting on 12 March) you’re invited to join with the Sisters of St Joseph, Affiliates and Josephite Companions as we participate in these virtual reflective moments.

Please note, the prayers can be done at any time.


Download these prayers resources here.

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