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Welcome to the Cathedral Parish e-News for this weekend. If you experience difficulty accessing any content, please visit stpatscathedral.weebly.com
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St Patrick's Cathedral, Ballarat


Communities of Alfredton, Ballarat, Cardigan
Lake Gardens, Lake Wendouree, Lucas, Newington


St Patrick's Cathedral Parish acknowledges that the Aboriginal people of Australia are our first nation peoples and the traditional owners and custodians of this land.

We are a child safe Parish following the Child Safe Standards outlined by the Victorian Government, implementing procedures and standards as directed by the Professional Standards Office of the Catholic Diocese of Ballarat.

FEAST of CHRIST the KING

21st November, 2021

3 Lyons St Sth Ballarat


Parish Office hours:
Tuesday - Friday
10.00am - 5.00pm

Telephone: 53 312 933

On Mondays the Parish Office is closed.

On weekends and after regular office hours,
the phone will be transferred to the on call priest
so that the Hospitals, Aged Care facilities, Funeral Directors
or others seeking the services of a priest may be responded to.

Cathedral Clergy: Frs Justin Driscoll and Eladio Lizada
Parish Coordinator: Anita Houlihan
Finance Officer: Kerrie McTigue

* * * * * *

St Patrick’s Cathedral
6.30pm Vigil

8.00am

10.30am

5.00pm

Sunday Masses with no limits on the numbers of those who can attend. Bookings are not required to attend these Masses, however,
QR code or registration upon entry and full vaccination status needs to be provided to the COVID Check-in Marshal please.

St Patrick’s Cathedral
6.30pm Vigil

8.00am

10.30am

5.00pm

St Patrick’s College Chapel
1431 Sturt St Ballarat
11.00am (this will be the final Sunday for this Mass)

             
Weekday Masses will be celebrated in the Cathedral
When the limit is indicated for 50 people, no vaccination status is required.

Monday 9.45am  (50)

Tuesday 10.00am

Wednesday  10.00pm

Thursday 10.00am

Friday          7.30am  (50)               12.05pm          11.30am Reconciliation

Saturday               10.00am                      10.30am Reconciliation

It will no longer be necessary to book for Sunday Masses.
Please check in with the COVID-19 Marshall who will verify your vaccination status

When someone’s vaccination status is unknown, there is a limit of 50 people able to attend Mass (with face mask please).
Aware that not everyone will be fully vaccinated, our parishes will each offer one Mass during the week where
no vaccination status will be required.


Monday          9.45am            St Patrick’s Cathedral             53 312 933

Tuesday             9.30am           St Michael’s Bungaree          53 340 450

Wednesday        9.30am          St Aloysius’ Redan                 0455 212 123

Thursday            10.00am        OLHC Wendouree                    53 392 302

Friday              7.30am            St Patrick’s Cathedral             53 312 933

Saturday             9.30am          St Alipius’ Ballarat East           53 326 611


* * * * * * * * * *

Celebrations of the sacrament of Baptism will continue to take place each Sunday, spread throughout the afternoon with each family gathering for the baptism of their child.

* * * * *
Become our friend and follow us on Facebook:
or find further information on our website here.


If you feel that you need support or would like to speak with a priest or a member of our Cathedral team please contact the Parish Office, which will be attended for the usual times (Tuesday – Friday, 10am – 5pm), on
53 312 933 or alternatively you can email

We encourage all parishioners to reach out to their neighbours, family members, friends, colleagues and especially to those that you know who live on their own.

For many, restrictions are a challenge and our pastoral care of each other is an expression of our faith in the compassionate Christ and belonging to the Body of Christ.


 
 

Readings for next week: Feast of Christ the King

First: Daniel 7:13-14    Second: Apocalypse 1:5-8

Gospel:    John 18:33-37


Readings for this week:   First Sunday of Advent

First: Jeremiah 33:14-16    Second: Hebrews 10:11-14, 18

Gospel:    Luke 21:25-28. 34-36


RECENT DEATHS:
Barry James, Pat Hogan, Leelamma Mathew

ANNIVERSARIES:
Andrew O'Brien
Don Warden

From Bishop Paul


November 18, 2021



Hello Everyone,
As you may have seen, the Victorian Government has announced new Covid regulations to come into effect from 11.59pm tonight (Thursday 18 November 2021).
The government website has not yet been fully updated. However, a government page gives a summary of key points. Under the heading “Weddings, funerals and worship”, the summary is as follows. “If everyone present is fully vaccinated, you can host or attend weddings, funerals and religious ceremonies at places of worship with no capacity limits or density limits. (Vaccination requirements will apply from the age of 12 and 2 months, unless a medical exemption applies.) If vaccination status isn’t being checked, these events are restricted to one person per 4 square metres up to a maximum of 50 people per facility.

The cap at funerals doesn’t include those required to conduct the funeral and the cap at weddings doesn’t include the marrying couple, celebrant or photographer.” I note in particular that there are no capacity and density limits for gatherings where everyone present is fully vaccinated.

I note also the increase in the limit to 50 people where vaccination status is not being checked.

For further details, you could go to the government website www.coronavirus.vic.gov.au as it is more fully updated in the coming days. I renew my thanks to you all for continuing to support one another through these trying times. As we take another step towards being able to gather for worship as a whole community, may the Holy Spirit unite us more and more with Christ and with one another.

God bless you all.

Bishop Paul.


Celebrating the 130th Anniversary of the Consecration of the Cathedral
The official opening of the church was in 1871 and when the Diocese of Ballarat was formed in 1874, the first Bishop, Dr Michael O'Connor chose it for his Cathedral. When St Patrick's Cathedral, Ballarat was finally consecrated on November 19th in 1891 by Cardinal Moran of Sydney, it was the first Catholic Cathedral consecrated in the Australian Colonies, making it today Australia's oldest consecrated Cathedral.
CELERATIONS OF THE
SACRAMENT OF CONFIRMATION
 
 
Congratulations to all the children who have prepared to celebrate their Sacrament of Confirmation this year.  
Children and their families were finally able to celebrate this week; on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday night, with the final group celebrating at the 6.30pm Vigil and Sunday 10.30am Masses.

AGUGO, Macval
AGUGO, N’etochukwu
ALVARADO, Emilio
ANDERSON, Keira
BAKER, Charlotte
BARCLAY, Mia
BAYLES, Eva
BEGBIE, Ruby
BENNETT, Finn
BENNETT, Ruby
BOOTSMAN, Lockie
BROMLEY, Lyla
BUNNING, Georgia
BURSIL, Charlie
BYVOET, Tom
CALDWELL, Sophie
CARBONE, Lewis
CARBONE, Rubi
CARUANA, Ashton
CARUANA, Harrison
CHANDLER, Xavier
CLARK, Ray
COLLARD, Zac
COLLINS, Charlie
COLLINS, Jakob
CORBETT, William
CROWE, Xavier
DALRYMPLE, Oscar
DAVEY, Annabel
DAVEY, Patrick
EAST, Thomas
ELKSNIS, Joey
ELLIS, Ethan
EMERSON, Rachel
EVERY, Gemma
FAY, Alex
FERNANDES, Sevilla
FFRENCH, Amy
FLORENCE, Oscar
FORD, Emerson
FOULKES, Harriet
GARCIAN, Alicia
GLEESON, Frankie
GOODWIN, Edie
GRAVENALL, Indie
GRIMA, Ethan
GRIME, Eva
GUNSSER, Levi

HAND, Elodie
HARWOOD, Summer
HERNAN, Eloise
HOGAN, Eliza
HOOD, Jackson
HORGAN, Oliver
ILSLEY, Thomas
IRVIN, Nellie
JARVIS, Toby
JOHNSON, Holly
JOHNSON, Rylie
JOHNSON, Sophie
JONES, Abby
JONES, Ava
KNOBEL, Joseph
KOROSEC, Jordan
KROUSSORATIS, Harry
LAFRANCHI, Dane
LAMB, Stella
LANNEN, George
LEMMON, Charlotte
LOADER, Amelia
LOUDEN, Evie
LYONS JUNQUEIRA, Noah
MARTIN, Anni
MARTIN, Remi
McCORMACK, Ned
McCONCHIE, Max
McNAULTY, Jake
MILLER, Seth
MILLER, Zana
MOLLOY, Billy
MORRIS, Sienna
MORRIS, Tessa
MORRISON, Asha
MORRISON, Henry
MORRISON, Teddy
MULCOCK, Milly
MULLER, Abraham
MURPHY, Ava
NESS, Lydia
OLDAKER, Liam
O’DONNELL, Callen
O’DONOHUE, Milla
O’HALLORAN, Petra
O’LOUGHLIN, Zoe
PARKINSON, Ryan
PELLY, Harry
PETRIE, Lily
PARKINSON, Ryan
PELLY, Harry
PETRIE, Lily
PICKLES, Emily
PRESTON, Benjamin
PRICE, Elwood
PRIDHAM, Dexter
PURTELL, Logan
QUICK, Ruby
ROGAN, Ivy
ROMEIN, Tahliska
RYAN, Audrey
RYAN, Sophie
SANDERS, Lachlan
SCOTT, Bryce
SHAW, Carter
SHEEHAN, Lucas
SHEEHAN, William
SHEPPARD, Charlie
SILAK, Ashton
SIMS, Jake
SIMS, Patrick
SKRYPKO, Jamie
SLOPER, Jaxyn
SMITH, Ayva
SMITH, Scarlett
SPRY, Olivia
STANLEY, Annabelle
STEVENS, Arlo
STOKES, William
STOTT, Elliot
SVILICIC, Jack

THOMAS, Ava
TITHERIDGE, Joshua
TITHERIDGE, Kayla
TRELOAR, Campbell
TYNDALL, Jonty
UNDERWOOD, Georgie
VON BURG, Andre
WALKER, Pippa
WALSH, Max
WEALANDS, Mylo
WEISSENFELD, Liam
WHITTLE, Clara
WILLIAMS, Sachi
WILLIAMSON, Marcus
WISEMAN, Alice
YATES, Mia
YELURI, Nathan
ZAKKAM, Samara
ZANETTE, Mia
ZEEGERS, Immi


Following the success of the Virtual Advent Talks last year, we are pleased to announce we will once again be hosting a series of Virtual Advent Talks for 2021.
Over four weeks, five Australian biblical scholars from Yarra Theological Union, a College of the University of Divinity will reflect on the extraordinary richness and beauty of the Advent readings.

Speaking to us from their own area of expertise will be:
  • Dr Mark O'Brien OP
  • Dr Janina Hiebel
  • Dr Mary Reaburn NDS
  • Dr Chris Monaghan CP
  • Prof Mary Coloe, pbvm

For more information click here to visit the blog which has further information.
Advent:  Online Learning

Our online learning partner, Dayton University, is offering two new Advent classes beginning November 28.  Advent: A Holy Waiting is designed as an e-retreat experience.  Participants will find enrichment for the season through scripture, spiritual reading and listening, group discussion, prayer, and sacred music; and Let This Be the Time: Spiritual Essentials for Life’s Second Act explores the needs of people in their later lives: what is happening and how to maximize these times for the deepening of our spirituality. Registration is open until November 25. More information or to register please go to the diocesan website or email djurdja.klaric@ballarat.catholic.org.au or phone 5337 7121.
Inclusivity – a political challenge
Image credit: vampy1/123rf.com
As we witness the Australian Government’s response to refugees and asylum seekers who are denied their most basic rights, John Haren reminds us that our best human moments are inclusive.
The first plane dispatched from Australia retrieved just 26 people from Kabul after the Taliban takeover. It was a gesture of tokenism amid a humanitarian crisis and symbolic of what was to come. Prime Minister Scott Morrison declared that Afghans already in Australia, despite the fact that they could not be sent back to their home country, would not be accorded permanency if they had arrived by boat. This, despite the fact that the overwhelming majority have been found to be refugees under Australia’s extremely rigorous, some would say excessive, review mechanisms.

If anyone was unclear about the Government’s attitude towards asylum seekers then this statement of intent during the hypercharged surge of the Taliban into Kabul was clearly not about inclusivity. It’s an approach that underscores the hard heartedness of successive federal governments that have inexplicably denied the basic rights of people seeking asylum in a country replete with people from all parts of the planet making significant contributions to our society.

When we seek to discriminate on the basis of race, colour or creed, (or mode of transport in seeking asylum), the humanity of each of us is diminished. Governments may hide behind the cloak of the fear of terrorism, or concerns about ‘Australian values’ being under attack, but for ordinary people seeking a life free of trauma, torture and alienation, a nation’s hard-line policy that flouts international covenants is perplexing. It reflects on all of us.

For Afghans seeking asylum in Australia to be reminded, immediately after the fall of their country to a fundamentalist conqueror, that they will never settle here is a dagger to their hearts at the very time loved ones back home struggle for survival.

Religious discrimination law 
is coming to the boil
It’s four years since the Australian Parliament amended the Marriage Act 1961 to provide that marriage means ‘the union of two people to the exclusion of all others’. The legislation followed the plebiscite on same sex marriage. To address the concerns of some religious groups, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull set up an expert panel chaired by long time Liberal Party minister Philip Ruddock to report on whether Australian law adequately protected the human right to freedom of religion. Having served on that committee, I made some public observations two years ago about our recommendations:

‘The Ruddock committee conceded that in theory there is a major lacuna in the array of anti-discrimination legislation. If you legislate to prohibit discrimination on the basis of gender, sexual orientation, age, race, or disability, why not on the basis of religion? …We recommended both a tweaked tightening of the exemptions for religious bodies in the Sex Discrimination Act and the introduction of a Religious Discrimination Act. The delay in release of the report and the shambolic handling of its publication highlighted the political problem with our recommendations. The Turnbull wing of the Liberal Party were troubled by the former but attracted to the latter.’

The issue is now back on the boil both in Canberra and in Melbourne. The tweaking of exemptions for religious bodies is not just a Commonwealth concern.  It is also a state issue. This week the Victorian Parliament is considering the Equal Opportunity (Religious Exceptions) Amendment Bill 2021. And the Morrison Government is secretly cobbling together a Religious Discrimination Bill.

The tweaking exercise relates to the discretion afforded to religious groups when it comes to the employment of staff in religious institutions. During our public consultations, the Ruddock panel ‘heard from a number of religious schools that argued that spiritual education is not just about teaching content in classes, but also the formation of a community or environment that supports the teachings of their faith. A key theme in these discussions was the need for staff to model the religious and moral convictions of the community and to uphold, or at least not to undermine, the religious ethos of the school. The Panel heard repeatedly that faith is “caught not taught”.’ I vividly recall one administrator from a very evangelical Pentecostal school telling us that the school gardener could be just as important as the religion teacher imparting to students a love of God and creation and contributing to a religious ethos in the school environment.

The tweaking proposed by the Victorian government has upset the Victorian Catholic Bishops and the leaders of several minority faiths who have published an open letter complaining that ‘the Bill erroneously disconnects religious belief from conduct that is consistent with this belief.’  The November 16 letter from the religious leaders has no signatories from the Uniting Church, and only one Anglican bishop. The signatories speak of parents’ expectation that a ‘school’s environment faithfully represents the religious ethos in every respect including the conduct of all teachers and staff’. The Victorian bill would allow ‘reasonable and proportionate’ religious discrimination in the employment of staff when ‘conformity with the doctrines, beliefs or principles of the religion’ is ‘an inherent requirement of the position’.  The religious leaders are left wondering what’s reasonable, what’s proportionate, and what’s inherent. Would the Victorian law allow the evangelical school to give preference employing the evangelical gardener?


Synod is Pope's 'biggest idea so far'

Synod23:
“I believe that synodality is an answer to the
challenges of our time.”

Bishop David O'Connell of Trenton, NJ, officially began the local process for his diocese's participation in preparations for the 2023 meeting of the world Synod of Bishops on synodality during Mass in St Mary of the Assumption Cathedral
CNS photo/Hal Brown, The Monitor

“The Church needs fixing,” scripture scholar Fr Kieran O’Mahony told the annual meeting of the Association of Catholic Priests. He argued that synodality is “the only game in town” and if the synodal journey fails, the Church will be “in serious trouble”.  

Setting out the context in which the worldwide synod and the national synod in Ireland are taking place, the Augustinian said: “The effective handing on of faith has ceased for some decades and we are now largely left with a shell of practice”.

He identified two major areas where the Church needs fixing as the place of women in the Church and the role of the laity.

“Eventually we are going to have to find some way to say that tradition does not exclude women from all levels of involvement and ministry,” he told the Zoom event.

The priest, who is a member of the Dublin diocesan committee for synod, described the synodal pathway as Pope Francis’ “biggest idea so far”.
The proposed consultation with every parish and every catholic in the world was “extraordinary” and differed from a traditional synod in that the process of getting there was at least as significant as the final gathering in Rome in 2023.
Pope Francis, he said, aimed to recover the “thrill” of Christian faith through gospel joy and to decentralise an “unwieldly” enormous church.


PLANNED GIVING
Thank you for contributing to the Cathedral collections this week:

Parish $685.00
Presbytery $1,145.00


Any queries or concerns, or to make a contribution, please contact the Parish Office or email Finance Officer Kerrie.

Reflection on the Readings

The liturgical year always ends with the celebration of the Feast of Christ the King. The gospel reading for Year B is from John's gospel where the notion of God's kin-dom or reign or empire features only twice in contrast with its frequent appearance in the other gospels, especially Matthew. For readers in a Western society where democratic rule is valued and promoted, the whole notion of kingship or monarchy poses some difficulty. We need to put the exchange between Jesus and Pilate into the political context of Roman occupied Judaea of the first century.

Rome was the dominant global force at that time. It had the economic and military strength to maintain its power over the whole Mediterranean world. When Jesus tells Pilate that his kingdom is not of this world, he is not pitting planet Earth or the cosmos over against a purely spiritual world. He is referring rather to the world and values of the Roman Empire and the destructive values that are sometimes espoused by his followers. Jesus’ way of being in the world stands in stark contrast with the expansionist and frequently destructive ways of Roman rule.

The term “world” is used in two different senses in John's gospel. It is used both literally and metaphorically. On the one hand, it is the world that came into being through the Word (1:10), the beautiful cosmos or world that “God so loved” (3:16). On the other hand, it is a “world” that rejected the light (1:10-11), a sinful world in need of the saving power of God (3:17).

Jesus, as king, does not claim the sort of over-bearing political, military or economic power that Pilate exercises on behalf of the Roman emperor. His authority has nothing to do with power over or domination of others. It is grounded in truth (1:17) or, in other words, in the revelation of God. Jesus is “the way, the truth and the life” (14:6) and his mission is to testify to the truth. The path to freedom and life lies in acceptance of the truth (8:32): "If you continue in my word, you…will know the truth, and the truth will make you free." Truth is not a given: it must be sought in prayerful dialogue, in listening to earth’s distress and, above all, in openness to the Spirit of God.

To celebrate this feast, then, is to move in the direction of peaceful solutions to the conflicts in our world and away from the paths of violence, domination and imperial expansionism. It is to seek the truth in dialogue and to respond to the plight of those who suffer the pain of hunger, of persecution and of loss. It is to rule as God rules and not as Rome ruled. It is to look again at how we inhabit our world and to change our ways for the sake of truth and life, the present and future life of our beleaguered planet.

-Veronica Lawson RSM
JOKE OF THE WEEK
 

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